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  • HOME
    • LOCAL EATS IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA’S CENTRAL VALLEY

    • LOCAL LIBATIONS INCLUDING BEER, WINE, MILK & COFFEE

    • FOOD FOR THOUGHT

    • GARDENING. EVENTS. TRAVEL. SHOPPING. MEET YOUR MAKERS.

    • FIND STORIES ABOUT LOCAL FOOD, FARMS, CHEFS, ARTISANS AND MORE IN OUR PAST ISSUE ARCHIVE.

    • FRESH, LOCAL, SEASONAL RECIPES AND KITCHEN INSPIRATION.

    • SUBSCRIBE TO THE MAGAZINE AND NEVER MISS AN ISSUE.

    • WHO WE ARE – HOW TO ADVERTISE – CONTACT US

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Edible Shasta Butte: Issue #55 – Fall/Winter Holidays 2020

Grist for the Mill

INVITE US IN!

In a recent On Being podcast, Sharon Salzburg, author and teacher on meditation and Buddhism, used a metaphor that has stayed with me. She quotes the Buddha’s teaching that our minds are “radiant,” “shining,” and that “it’s because of visiting forces that we suffer,” not because of something inherent to us. She imagines such a force knocking on her door (she names her visiting force Lucy), invites her inside, and gives her a meal. Not “the run of the house”—a meal.

So I find myself imagining my holiday table.

The usual human suspects will not be eating there—but visiting forces will be! Bring a side dish! Bring bread to break! Pies!

Welcome!

This issue of Edible Shasta-Butte combines our typical fall and winter issues into one. Combining is one way we have chosen to invite the Covid suffering in. It means we approach our advertisers once instead of twice, since they have their own visiting forces knocking. It means our costs are halved.

I am heartened that the CSA movement grows locally, as well as nationally. That so many people shop at farmers’ markets hereabouts and cook at home, sometimes offering what they make to others. That local kitchens, whether in restaurants or storefronts or repurposed garages and outbuildings, offer takeout and delivery. That coffee shops have opened and deliver. And that new restaurants and new farms are finding customers, even in this moment.

If you possibly can, support these ventures. Gift certificates from them will both delight recipients and support local businesses. If you can, support this magazine too by subscribing and giving a gift subscription. We knock on your door in these moments. Invite us in.

Candace Byrne, Editor

On the Cover

Susan Lofthouse Meade is a botanical artist who lives in Redding. For this autumn/winter harvest wreath, she found inspiration, awe, and actual live botanical specimens in her back yard. “Fall and early winter offer sumptuous citrus, herbs, persimmons, and pomegranates,” she commented. “At the same time, old feathered friends come eagerly to the seed feeders and stumble upon the ripening pyracantha berries. Acorns from the oaks delight the squirrels and speckle the lawn and driveway.” For this project, Susan used both watercolor and colored pencil. You can see more of her artwork on her website: splofthouse.wixsite.com/botanical-art.